Local Housing Allowance (LHA)

You’ve come to this page because our search has not worked properly for your postcode. We’ve logged the error and we’ll try to fix it for next time. You can still use the information below to find the corrrect LHA rates for your postcode and covert them correctly into their monthly equivalents.

Privately rented accommodation

The Local Housing Allowance is not benefit in its own right. It is one of a number of ways in which the Housing Costs Element of Universal Credit (or your Housing Benefit) may be reduced to an amount which is less than your actual rent.

The LHA applies principally to private sector tenants. Social tenants may instead be subject to the Bedroom Tax depending on their circumstances.

Search for the Local Housing Allowance rates in your area

Unfortunately the gov.uk search only shows weekly figures. The calculation to convert these weekly amounts into monthly amounts is more complicated than you’d think and people often get it wrong. The box below will do it for you correctly.

Work out the monthly equivalents

If your rent is paid weekly there is a different calculation to convert this into a monthly figure. If you need to do this the box below will convert it correctly for you.

Work out which rate of the LHA applies

The number of bedrooms in your property has no bearing on which rate applies. Instead you must work out how many bedrooms you are entitled to under the rules, this is based on who you live with.

Check who counts

For Universal Credit, only include:

  • you – and a partner if you have one
  • dependent children
  • other adults who don’t pay rent

Don’t include lodgers or joint tenants except for your partner.

For Housing Benefit, count everyone who lives in your home including:

  • all the people listed under the UC rules; plus any
  • lodgers and other joint tenants

Which rate applies

Shared accomodation rate

For HB, if you are single or a couple, have no children, and are under 35 (or you are any age and actually live in shared accommodation) you’ll usually only be entitled to the ‘shared accommodation rate’ but there are exceptions.

For UC, if you are single, have no children, and are under 35 you’ll usually only be entitled to the ‘shared accommodation rate’ but there are exceptions.

You can generally claim for 1 bedroom for each of the following: 

  • you – and a partner if claiming as a couple
  • each other couple (only if you claim HB) 
  • each other person aged 16 or over (even if part of a couple if you claim UC) 
  • 2 children under 16 of the same sex
  • 2 children under 10 of any sex
  • any other child under 16

You can only claim for a maximum of 4 bedrooms, including any of the extra bedrooms allowed under the rules below

Extra bedroom for a foster child

You qualify for 1 extra bedroom if you have one or more foster children placed with you, or for up to 12 months between placements. You only get one extra bedroom regardless of how many foster children you have.

Extra bedroom for an overnight carer

You qualify for an extra bedroom if anyone in your household receives overnight care on a regular basis from a non-resident carer and gets any of the following benefits: 

  • PIP – daily living component
  • DLA – middle or high care component
  • Attendance Allowance – higher rate if you get HB; any rate if you get UC

Extra bedroom for a disabled person who can’t share a bedroom

You qualify for an extra bedroom if due to disability:

  • an adult can’t share with their partner
  • a child can’t share with another child

The disabled person must get one of the following benefits:

  • PIP – daily living component
  • DLA – middle or high care component
  • Attendance Allowance – higher rate